Muhammad in the Quran, Vol. 1: Chapter 8


 

MUHAMMAD SIMILAR TO BIBLICAL PROPHETS?

If you read the Quran's tales about the old Jewish prophets and other claimed prophets, and also about the 3 claims Arab prophets Hud, Salih and Shu'ayb, you will be struck by how similar those stories are to Muhammad's experience and situation up to the time when the respective verses were told. There likely were at least these reasons for this:

  1. 1: Muhammad had no proofs for his claim that he represented a god. If his experiences were similar to the old prophets' he could claim that was an indication for that also he was a prophet/messenger.

  2. 2: Muhammad was little accepted the first 12-15 years. If the old prophets were told to have got the same reception and treatment, that was an indication for that the way Muhammad was treated was normal treatment of prophets, and this could be used for the claim that Muhammad was a normal - though top - prophet.
  3. 3: If Muhammad and the old prophets got the same reception and treatment, that could be claimed to be an indication for that Muhammad was in the same line of prophets as they - something Muhammad claimed.

The parallels are very easy to see, but we include a number of samples:

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001 6/10a: "Mocked were (many) Messengers before thee (Muhammad*) - - -". Muhammad was mocked. By claiming this was more or less normal for prophets, he tried to reduce the effect of the mocking - and quite likely succeeded, at least among his followers. This kind of arguments has such an effect.

002 6/34a: "Rejected were the Messengers before thee (Muhammad*) - - -." Muhammad was rejected by many. But cheer up: Rejection was normal for real prophets! - "ergo" Muhammad is consequently a prophet like other prophets. Pep-talk. There is some pep-talk in the Quran.

003 6/90d: "No reward do I ask of you - - -". This was one of Muhammad’s claims, and then it was good to have the earlier prophets say the same - indicating this was what real prophets said. And Muhammad took nothing? No, only 1/5 of everything stolen or robbed, included slaves - 100% if the victims gave in without fighting - (for comparison: Yahweh once in the Bible (4. Mos. 31 /28) demanded 1/500 - Allah via his representative (?) Muhammad demanded 1/5 = 100 times as much! The same god?), tax = 2.5% on average of everything you own (not earn, but own) each and every year (if you are not too poor) and 10% of everything dug out of the earth + plenty of women + total obedience and total power over you. No, Muhammad demanded "nothing" from his followers! (Reality incompatible with at least NT).

004 7/63a: (Noah said:) "Do ye (his people*) wonder that there hath come to you a messenger from your Lord (Allah*), through a man of your own people - - -?" Muhammad is making a parallel to himself (he often does in the Quran) - the claim (and in this case mostly correct - as most of the confirmed(?) ones were Jews working among Jews (but not all)) is that prophets come from among their own people, so then it is very normal that Muhammad is an Arab amongst Arabs, Muhammad claimed.

005 7/66a: Muhammad like so often makes the story a parallel to himself (he too often does) - it tells his audience that meeting disbelief and little success was normal for prophets - and consequently Muhammad's situation (in 621 AD) was normal, and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet.

006 7/67a: Muhammad makes the story a parallel to himself (he often does) - it tells his audience that meeting disbelief and little success was normal for prophets - and consequently Muhammad's situation (in 621 AD) was normal, and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet.

007 7/68a: "I (Hud*) am to you ('Ad*) a sincere and trustworthy adviser". Muhammad is once more making a parallel to his own situation - this is exactly his own message to the Arabs. And to his followers: That prophets are distrusted is normal, and thus his own situation in Mecca was normal for a prophet - reassuring for his then few followers in 621 AD to "know".

008 7/69a: "Do ye (people*) wonder that there hath come to you a message from the Lord (Allah*) through a man of your own people - - -?" Muhammad is making - in the broad lines - an exact copy of his own situation, to show that his own situation is normal for prophets. There are several such cases in the Quran, making the "explanation" too obvious.

009 7/70a: A new parallel to Muhammad's position - one of many. See 7/66a and 7/68a above.

010 7/75a: "The leaders of the arrogant party among his (Salih's*) people said to those who were reckoned to be powerless - - -". An exact parallel to Muhammad's situation in Mecca when this surah was made, where the leaders opposed the mostly poor followers of Muhammad. It is typical for the Quran that a far larger part of the stories than coincidence would predict, are parallels to Muhammad's situation at the time of the emergence of the different surahs, and thus telling his followers and others that his situation was normal for prophets, true or not, and thus that he was a normal prophet.

011 7/75-76: Another parallel (see f.x. 7/68a above) to Muhammad's situation in Mecca in 621 AD - nice and reassuring for his followers to know this situation just was normal for a prophet.

013 7/88b: This verse is another close parallel to Muhammad's position at the time of claimed revelation - here in Mecca in 621 AD. Nice for his followers to "know" that Shu'ayb was right and that in the following verses his opponents were punished. And that Shu'ayb came out the winner. Psychologically a good story for the at that time few Muslims.

014 7/90b: "The leaders - - - said: "If ye (people*) follow Shu'ayb - - -". See 7/88a above.

015 7/93b: "- - - the Message for which I (Shu'ayb*) was sent by my Lord (Allah*) - - -."If the message was like the one in the Quran, like the Quran indicates, it hardly was from any god - too many mistakes, etc.

016 7/143c: “- - - I (Moses) am the first to believe.” This one is similar to f. ex. 6/14, except here it is Moses instead of Muhammad. But it contradicts the Quran's telling that f. ex. Adam, Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael, Jacob, Joseph, Hud, Salih, Shu'ayb and others were believing Muslims before him. And Moses and all the others were making a lie out of Muhammad’s saying that he – Muhammad – was the first. A number of contradictions. (2/127-133, 3/67, 6/14, 6/163, 26/51). Muslims tells that these contradictions are not contradictions, because it is meant the first of a group, a nation, or something – but that is not what the Quran says, and it also does not explain all cases.

But as neither science nor Islam has been able to find traces from neither a religion like Islam, nor a god like Allah, nor a book like the Quran older than 610 AD, Muhammad in reality may have been the first believer in Islam - if he really was a believer (scientists analyzing the Quran tend to believe he believed in the start, but became more of a dictator and less of a believer over the years - using his religion to gain power, like so many a self proclaimed "prophet".

017 10/72a: "- - - no reward have I (Noah*) asked of you (his followers*) - - -". This was one of Muhammad's claims about himself, and then it was psychologically wise to "show" that former claimed prophet said the same - it made Muhammad a normal prophet. And Muhammad only claimed 20% of everything stolen, included enslaved victims - 100% if they did not have to fight for it - some 2.5% of all your belongings each and every year in tax (zakat), all fit men as warriors for him whenever he wanted, 100% power, 100% dictatorship, 100% control of what you said and meant. And lots of women (at least 36 are known by name). Of course this was all (except the women?) for Allah, but here on Earth the reality was for Muhammad. Yes, we agree; Muhammad like Noah demanded no reward. Or - - -?

018 10/78d: "- - - in order that you (Moses*) and your brother (Aaron*) may have greatness in the land (Egypt*)?" YA1463 comments: "Notice how they (Pharaoh Ramses II and his men*) attribute evil motives to the men of Allah, motives of ambitions and lust for power - - -. The same device was used against Al Mustafa (another name for Muhammad*)". For one thing this kind of insinuations from Ramses II is not mentioned in the Bible. But more interesting is that Yusuf Ali here turns the facts (the only perhaps facts are in the Bible, as the Quran and all its mistakes are not from any god, and thus not from any reasonably reliable source) upside down: Like so many places the history of real or claimed historical prophets was changed to become parallels to Muhammad's own life and story, to make him look like the old prophets, and thus a normal prophet.

019 11/25c: "I (Noah*) have come to you with a Clear Warning - - -". Noah here mimics Muhammad - like the Quran tells more or less all claimed prophets in the book does. Whether the tales are true or not, they have the effect that Muhammad's words seems to be normal for prophets, and thus "tell" that Muhammad was a normal prophet.

020 11/27a: Noah got similar reception like Muhammad in Mecca = Muhammad's reception is normal (this was before he gained power) for a prophet = Muhammad is a normal prophet. Good for his few followers to "know". (There are many stories like this in the Quran - all prophets are more or less parallel stories to Muhammad's up to the time when the verse was told to his followers.)

021 11/27d: "- - - nor do we (Noah's contemporaries*) see that any follow thee (Noah*) but the meanest among us - - -". This means Noah had followers according to the Quran. Which again means they were taken on board the ark, like mentioned in 11/40 - a prophet could not leave good Muslims to drown. In the Bible only Noah and his family - 8 persons - were on board. AND NB: In 11/40 also the Quran tells that only the animals + not even the whole of Noah's family were to enter the ark. The followers were ditched?

But by adding poor followers, Muhammad got the picture of Noah's situation to be a close parallel to his own in 621 AD. Ergo poor followers in the beginning were a sign for Muhammad being a real prophet. Psychologically a good story to tell Muhammad's follower The parallels are so obvious to see, that we only point to some of them.

022 11/31a: "I (in this case Noah*) tell you not that with me are the Treasures of Allah, nor do I know what is hidden (Muhammad was unable to foretell the future - and strangely so was Noah according to the Quran*) - - -". The main topic similar to 11/29 above.

##023 11/31b: "- - - nor do I (Noah aka Muhammad*) know what is hidden - - -". = I do not see the future = I cannot make prophesies. And a man who cannot make prophesies is no real prophet. (There are made other definitions for a prophet, but how many are willing to accept that a person unable to make prophesies is a real prophet? In the really old Israel the title even was "a seer" not "a prophet".) Muhammad just "borrowed" this weighty and glorious title, and may be needed one more alibi for that prophets could lack the ability to make prophesies. (But what kind of prophet is one such who is unable to make prophesies - and on top of all never is able to produce a single proof for a connection to a god?)

But note how Muhammad made Noah like himself = as Noah was a prophet, the claimed similarity "proved" that also Muhammad was one. Muhammad made similar "adjustments" of old stories many places in the Quran, and thus "proved" he himself had to be a prophet, as he was treated just like he claimed the old and perhaps real prophets were treated.

024 11/31c: "- - - nor claim I (Noah aka Muhammad*) to be an angel". Which was as well, because the real and historical Muhammad - in contrast to the glorified picture in Islam - was very far from being an angel, this even in Islamic literature (skip the glorification and read his demands, incitements and deeds, etc. and you get the true Muhammad).

025 11/32c: "- - - bring upon us (non-Muslims*) what thou (Noah*) what thou threaten us with - - -". = Bring us proof. Like so many other stories about prophets or claimed prophets in the Quran an exact parallel to Muhammad's situation, and thus a "confirmation" of that Muhammad was a prophet like the old ones. But Muhammad never was able to prove anything - in contrast to f.x. Noah.

026 11/35b: "He (Noah? Muhammad?*) has forged it?" Already then - at the time of Muhammad - some people saw that things might be wrong. This always has been a suspicion. And if even Noah met the suspicion, it was easier for Muhammad's followers to tackle it.

027 11/35c: (A11/54 – in 2008 edition A11/57): In a new repetition of the story about Noah – it is repeated many times in the Quran – comes this: “Or do they (people*) say, ‘He has forged it?’ Say: ‘If I had forged it, on me were my sin! And I am free of the sins of which ye are guilty.” Does this refer to the story of Noah? – that he had forged that story? Or does it refer to the entire Quran? – or both? The disposition of the texts in the book is so bad with bits and pieces strewn around in a mix, and repetitions and repetitions of the same stories and arguments and conclusions, so anything is possible when it comes to the possibility to find loose bits of tales or arguments at “funny” places. In this case Islam simply is at a loss to know what to believe. One tends to think the verse is a passage inserted in the story, and that Muhammad is talking both about the story of Noah and about the complete Quran (Ibn Kathir, Tabari). But it is impossible to know. Such “quoting in wrong context” or inserting of text where it does not belong, is very usual in the Quran – so usual that Islam use a special name for it: “A parenthetic inclusion” or similar. It is pretty confusing sometimes, and absolutely does not result in “a clear language easy to understand” – f.x. like here where it is impossible to be sure of exactly he is talking about. To say the least of it: Not a piece of good literature.

From the text it seems like the book has switched to Muhammad in this sentence.

028 11/50c: "- - - Hud - - -". A claimed prophet in Arabia (to the 'Ad people). You meet him nowhere outside the Quran and linked books. He - like all claimed or documented (?) prophets in the Quran - met with similar problems like Muhammad met when it came to being believed - satisfying at least for Muhammad's followers who then "understood" that Muhammad's problems were normal for prophets, and that Muhammad thus had to be a prophet. His real interest for the story is that he (and a few others included Moses during his 40 years exile from Egypt before the Exodus), are claimed to have worked as prophets in Arabia, whereas the Quran tells that Muhammad worked for a people - the Arabs - who had had no prophet before.

####With the partly exception of Jesus - who was too well known - all prophets or claimed prophets told about in the Quran, are bent into a frame to be parallels to Muhammad. A coincidence?

11/50ca: "- - - Hud, one of their own brethren". A parallel to Muhammad. He was an Arab and claimed Allah sent prophets/messengers to the different people from their own people - the Arab Muhammad to Arabs, the 'Ad Hud to the 'Ad tribe, etc.

029 11/51a: "I (Hud - see 11/50b just above) ask you for no reward for this (message)". Quite similar to 11/29a above. And a parallel to Muhammad.

030 11/51b: "My (Hud's*) reward is from none but (Allah*) - - -". Quite similar to 11/29a above.

031 11/53d: As for this verse - like so many others: Do you see the exact parallel to Muhammad's position at the time when the verse was released in 621 AD?

033 11/91c: "Were it not for thy (Shu'ayb's*) family, we should certainly have stoned thee. For thou hast amongst us no great position!" Is it possible to make a closer parallel to Muhammad's position in Mecca in 621 AD when this surah was released? - he had to flee shortly after, because the support from his family grew weaker. It is strange how all prophets in the Quran fit Muhammad's position at the time when the respective surahs are launched - and thus "verify" that his position is normal for prophets, and thus that he is a normal prophet. Some co-incidence!

034 11/120b: "All that We (Allah*) relate to thee (Muhammad/Muslims*) of stories about the prophets - with it We make firm thy heart - - -". Nearly all the prophets the Quran tells about, met the same problems like Muhammad up to the time when the surah was published (this surah is from 621 AD) - reassuring to know for his followers: Muhammad was a normal prophet with normal difficulties, and his opponents would be punished.

035 11/120d: "- - - with it (stories from claimed or documented prophets*) We make firm thy (Muhammad's/Muslims'*) heart - - -". As mentioned many/all of the stories - true or twisted or made up ones - were parallels to Muhammad's situation and showed them that what happened to Muhammad, was "normal" for prophets - "ergo" Muhammad was a normal prophet with normal problems. How true the stories were, may be a question, but they worked.

036 14/10j: "Ye (the claimed prophets*) are no more than humans, like ourselves! Ye wish to turn us away from the (gods) our fathers used to worship: then bring us some clear authority". Do you see the close parallel to Muhammad's own position in 621-622 AD when this surah was released? There are dozens of such parallels to Muhammad in the Quran - each story about a claimed prophet or good man in the book parallels Muhammad's situation at the time of releasing the relevant surah. This simply is Muhammad's way of explaining away for his followers his difficulties and problems of being accepted by most people, and at the same time "documenting" that such problem were normal for prophets, and thus "proving" that Muhammad was a normal prophet. To quote Mr. Stalin: "Once is coincidence, twice is suspicious, thrice is proof". Muhammad did not make such parallels twice or thrice, but more or less every time he told tales about earlier real or claimed prophet (with a partly exception for Jesus - he was too special and too well known for that his history could be twisted too much). Would a god need to prove himself or his prophet in such a clumsy way? - then who made the Quran?

037 14/10k: “Ye (the claimed prophets*) wish to turn us (pagan Arabs*) away from the (gods) our fathers used to worship: then bring us some clear authority.” These pagans did not say no - they asked for proof. Proofs would have made an impression, but like Muhammad Islam's(?) prophets(?) also at these times could prove nothing. But no doubt: People asked for proofs. Muhammad only had fast talk and claims to offer instead of proofs.

038 14/10-17: One of the many stories claiming that more or less all former prophets had had similar problems like Muhammad (this was in 621-622 AD before Muhammad started gaining power). Such stories were confirmations to his followers and alibis for his claims towards others that he was a "bona fide" prophet. As most of these stories ended with that the opponents were severely punished, they also were pep-talks for his followers, and it was good for their moral to "know" the "enemy" will be punished, whereas "we" go to Paradise. True or not - it often is what you believe which counts for many. There are many storied like this in the Quran - they are easy for you to find. Also see 14/10j above.

039 14/11a: "Their (earlier peoples*) messengers said to them: 'True, we are humans like yourselves - - -.'" It seems to have been essential for Muhammad to tell his followers that he was a normal prophet, and met problems and distrust prophets normally met - that made it easier for his followers to believe in him. Nearly all former prophets - real or not - he told about, he claimed had identical stories to his own = he was identical to the old accepted prophets = Proof - I am a real prophet. Also see 14/10j above.

040 14/11e: "It is not for us (claimed earlier prophets*) to bring an authority except as Allah permits". Muhammad never was able to prove one atom of his central claims. Here in his tale the situation was the same for claimed former prophets = Muhammad's inability to prove anything was normal for prophets - at least this is Muhammad's not proved claim. Also see 9/98b above. But here he keeps an opening open: If Allah will. Which explains why some Jewish prophets included Jesus and even f.x. Paul made miracles - Allah did it.

041 15/11: "But never came a Messenger to them (people*) to them but they mocked them." On one side this is not true - there were prophets in Israel who were not mocked (f.x. Samuel) - any god had known this, Muhammad likely not, as he at least in 621 AD hardly knew the real Jewish scriptures. But on the other hand these were good and psychologically nice words for his followers to hear in a difficult year like 621 AD; Muhammad's situation was normal for a prophet - he had to be a prophet.

042 15/72b: "- - - (O Prophet) - - -". It is not 100% clear to whom the word "prophet" refers, as also Lot according to the Quran was a prophet. But it seems that Allah is telling this story to Muhammad, and that it thus refers to him. But Muhammad was no real prophet. The definition of a prophet was a person who could see at least parts of the unseen, and thus a person who:

  1. Has the gift of and close enough connection to a god for making prophesies.
  2. Makes prophesies which always or at least mostly come true.
  3. Makes so frequent and/or essential prophesies, that it is a clear part of his mission.

A few things Muhammad said, came true – like it has to do for any person saying many things through many years – and most of what he said which did not come true, was forgotten (also this is what normally happens if it is nothing spectacular). But he did not guess the future correctly often - actually he statistically and according to the laws of probability should have "hit the mark" far more often by sheer chance than he did - there just are a few cases where Muslims will claim he foretold something correctly, and few if any of them are "perfect hits". But then the Quran makes it pretty clear that even though he was intelligent, he had little fantasy, and that he also was nearly unable to make innovative thinking (nearly all his tales and his ideas in reality were "borrowed" ones - though often twisted to fit his new religion).

The main things here, though are that Muhammad never indicated that anything of what he said was meant as prophesies, that he never indicated, not to mention claimed, that he had the gift of prophesying - of "seeing the unseen" - that it nowhere is documented that all/most of what he said about the future came true (point 2 above), and finally that both he and Islam said and says that Muhammad was unable to see the unseen (extra revealing here is that the old Biblical title for a prophet, was "a seer" - one who saw the unseen (f.x. 1. Sam. 9/9)) and also that Islam even today admits there were no miracles connected to Muhammad “except the Quran” (prophesying is a kind of miracle - seeing what has not yet happened). (This fact that Islam admits there were no miracles connected to Muhammad "except the revelation of the Quran" also is a solid proof for that all the miracles connected to Muhammad mentioned in the Hadiths and in legends, are made up stories - but all the same many a mullah and imam and scholar use these stories, which Islam admits are made up ones, as "proofs" for that Muhammad had supernatural powers and was a prophet. Honesty is not the strong side of Muslim religious leaders.) Also see 30/40a and 30/46a, and we also should add that his favorite wife (and infamous child wife) Aisha according to Hadiths (f.x. Al-Bukhari) stated that anyone saying Muhammad could foresee things, were wrong.

Verse 7/188b also is very relevant here: "If I (Muhammad*) had knowledge of the Unseen (= what is hidden or what has not happened yet*), I should have - - -". IT IS VERY CLEAR THAT MUHAMMAD DID NOT HAVE THE PROPHETS' ABILITY TO SEE "THE UNSEEN" - he was no real prophet. Similar in 6/50a, 7/188b, 10/20c+d, 10/49a, and 72/26.

Like mentioned: Also relevant here is that the original title of the Jewish prophets as mentioned was not "prophet" but "seer" - one who saw at least parts of the unseen. (F.x. 1. Sam. 9/9#, 1. Sam. 9/11, 1. Sam. 9/18, 1. Sam. 9/19, 2. Kings. 17/13, 1. Chr. 9/22, 1. Chr. 26/28, 1. Chr. 29/29, 2. Chr. 9/29, 2. Chr. 16/7, 2. Chr.16/10, 2. Chr. 19/2, 2. Chr. 29/25, Amos 7/12, Mic. 3/7 - some places the two titles even are used side by side). Muhammad thus so definitely was no seer - prophet - even according to his own words; he had no "knowledge of the unseen". One more proof for that he was not in the same line - not to say league - as Jesus, if the Bible and/or the Quran tell the truth about Jesus on this point.

Many liked - and like - the title prophet, and there have been made other definitions for this title - the most common of these are "one who brings messages from a god", or "one who represents a god", or "one who acts/talks on behalf of a god". But the fact remains: Without being able to prophesy, he or she is no real prophet. A messenger for someone or something - ok. An apostle - ok. But not a real prophet.

###This is a fact no Muslim will admit: Muhammad in reality simply was no real prophet or seer. Perhaps a messenger for someone or something or for himself – or perhaps an apostle – but not a real prophet. He only “borrowed” that impressive and imposing title. It is up to anyone to guess why.

It also is remarkable that Muhammad relatively seldom used the title "prophet" about himself in the Quran. He mostly used the title "Messenger", even though messenger in reality means an errand-boy (Muslims try to make this title something big and imposing, but this is the meaning of it). "Prophet" on the other hand is a heavy and impressive title telling a lot about the person. May the reason for why he did not use it so often, be that he knew he did not have what it took to merit that title, and was a little careful using it, so as not to provoke questions or comments? (And is this also the reason why Muslims try to pretend that "messenger" is something more impressive and heavy than "prophet"?)

043 15/80a: "The People of the Rocky Tract also rejected their messengers". - just like Muhammad was rejected in Mecca. Thus rejection was normal for prophets according to the Quran - and Muhammad thus must be a normal prophet. Nearly everything older prophets experienced, paralleled parts of Muhammad's life up to the time the relevant surah was published.

044 22/42-44: Muhammad was not generally accepted as a prophet until late in his career. Here Allah(?) claims that do be disbelieved was the norm for prophets, and lists a number of biblical and other claimed prophets which he claimed all had got the same treatment as he - implication; Mohammad got a normal treatment for prophets and thus was a normal prophet. For one who in reality was no prophet at all (he did not have the gift making him able to make prophesies) it was a brash claim.

045 22/52a: "Never did We (Allah*) send a messenger or a prophet before thee (Muhammad*), but when he framed a desire, Satan threw some (vanity) into his desire - - -". Another topic which Muhammad sometimes return to - he has weaknesses, but all prophets had weaknesses and were tempted by the Devil (not documented), which he indirectly claims is an indication for that he is a normal prophet. Invalid proof, as to meet temptations is nothing specific for prophets - it is normal for all humans.

046 23/24d: "- - - his (Noah's*) wish is to assert his superiority over you (people*) - - -". This is a very common wish from founders of new sects and religions - f.x. Muhammad was in a similar situation, and he made himself the superior when he gained power, (though just in this case and in some other cases in the Quran from before Muhammad thought he would ever gain much power, it is likely meant as irony: "Hear how stupid their accusations are towards one who just want to teach religion" - and to put himself in line with most of the old Jewish prophets, who most of them had no political or military power. It is very typical for Muhammad to make prophets and other "positive" figures be a copy of his own situation at the time the different verses were published, and thus "show" his followers that his situation was typical for prophets (and thus that Muhammad was a typical prophet).

047 23/25b: "He (Noah*) is only a man possessed - - -". Muhammad was accused of this, and then it was a psychologically good idea to "show" his followers that this was normal for prophets. But in a way the ones suspecting Muhammad to lack something mentally may be they were right - according to medical science the illness Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) would explain his claimed experiences very well.

048 23/26b: "- - - they (non-Muslims*) accuse me (Noah*) of falsehood!". Muhammad was accused of this, and then it was a psychologically good idea to "show" his followers that this was normal for prophets. But at least when it comes to Muhammad, his critics may have been right: All the mistaken facts, etc. prove that something was - and is - wrong in the Quran and thus in his religion.

049 23/33b: "He (the unknown prophet*) is no more than a man like yourself: he eats of that which ye (the prophet's contemporaries*) eat, and drinks of what ye drink". This was one of the arguments Muhammad met at home. Here he indicates that this was a normal argument from disbelievers towards prophets (it is not a normal or heavy one in the Bible), and thus that Muhammad is a normal prophet. There are quite a number of similar cases in the Quran. But they - and this - are not from the Bible.

050 23/34b: "(The chiefs said*) If ye (people after the time of Noah*) obey a man like yourself (a la Muhammad*), behold, it is certain that ye will be lost". See 23/24b above.

051 23/35b: "Does he (the claimed Muslim prophet*) promise that when ye (people*) die and ye become dust and bones, ye shall be brought forth (again)?" Remember here that what Muhammad promised and Islam promises, is that Allah shall find all the pieces and juices - all atoms and molecules - you were made by and put everything together again and then wake you up to the claimed next life. The old Arabs knew about a possible waking up of your soul, but this process with putting everything together and waking you up bodily, was a bit hard to swallow - it still is for people knowing some about chemistry, physics, etc. - especially as a life free from the cumbersome body like in NT is a far more attractive alternative for a possible next life. (But in Islam's Paradise most of the pleasures are bodily ones, and then Muhammad needed bodily resurrection - very different form NT where Jesus tells that in Paradise you become like the angels (f.x. Luke 20/36) - the same god and the same Paradise? - impossible.

But a copy of Muhammad's experiences like so much in the Quran - - - "proving" Muhammad's problems were normal for prophets, and that Muhammad thus was a normal prophet - though the greatest one. Not from the Bible.

052 23/38c: "He (the unknown prophet*) is only a man who invents a lie against Allah, but we (people*) are not the ones to believe in him!" Exchange "Allah" with "al-Lah" and this is exactly what the people in the old Mecca told Muhammad. Therefore, when Muhammad claimed older prophets had been told the same, his followers could believe Muhammad's situation was normal for prophets and Muhammad a normal prophet.

*053 23/39c: “(The prophet (because of 23/31-32 and 23/41 it is unclear which prophet, perhaps Muhammad but likely someone else*)) said - - - they accuse me of falsehood.” If it was not Muhammad: Similar to Muhammad's situation. Therefore, when Muhammad claimed older prophets had been told the same, his followers could believe Muhammad's situation was normal for prophets and Muhammad a normal prophet.

054 26/27c: "Truly your messenger (Moses*) who has been sent to you (Pharaoh Ramses II*) is a veritable madman!" Notice that this is the same as was said about Muhammad by some in Mecca. If you read the Quran, you will see that most of the claimed or real prophets told about, are told to have had similar experiences like Muhammad. Simply Muhammad's way to tell his surroundings and followers - true or not true - that this was the normal reception of prophets, and thus that he was a normal prophet.

Like much more in this story, this is not from the Bible.

055 26/52a: "By inspiration We (Allah*) told Moses - - -". All the other things aside: The word "inspiration" is not mentioned in the Bible in connections like this. Yahweh gave his messages either by direct contact, by visions, or by means of dreams (4. Mos. 12/6-8). But this was the method by which Muhammad claimed he got most of his information and orders from his god, and then it had value that his followers believed this was the normal way of contact with their god for prophets - and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet with normal contact with his god. You will find several claims in the Quran saying that different prophets received their information etc. by inspiration. A number of places - like here - this information is added without having any meaning or value for the story - obviously for some reason outside the story, like telling the audience about the claimed normal way for the god to contact his claimed prophets.

To get his verses and surahs "by inspiration", was a very convenient way to receive it: Not possible for anyone to check, and very easy to subtract or add points or more - - - and easy to make up verses and more. This religious part of the story about Exodus is not from the Bible (in the Bible it only was “let my people go") - but by adding it, Muhammad made it fit one of his 3 - 4 standard receipts for tales in the Quran.

056 26/107: "I (Noah*) am to you (people*) a messenger worthy all trust". This was more or less what Muhammad claimed about himself, and then it was good psychology that former prophets said the same - this made Muhammad's words more likely. You many places in the Quran find this kind of psychology used.

057 26/109b: "- - - my (Noah's*) reward is only from (Allah*) - - -". Another parallel to Muhammad legitimizing Muhammad as a claimed prophet. see 26/108 above.

058 26/110: "So fear Allah and obey me". Identical to 26/108 above.

####059 26/115b: "I (Noah/Muhammad*) am sent only to warn in public". Parallel to Muhammad - these were his words this early. (Many of the stories are parallels to Muhammad's at the time it was told - legitimating that his situation was normal for prophets, and thus that he was a normal prophet.) Reality changed later when he became powerful - then force and terror entered the picture".

060 26/123a: "The 'Ad people - - -". A tribe from old Arab folklore. It may or may not have existed - some traces may indicate that a tribe with this name once lived in Arabia (though in case much later than the Quran indicates), but the rest of what you find about them in the Quran, you only find in the Quran. From where did Muhammad get the stories? As the Quran with all its mistakes is not from a god, the only alternatives are legends, folklore, fairy tales, or fantasy.

061 26/125a: The self proclaimed prophet (according to the Quran) Hud said: "I am to you a messenger worthy of all trust". This was one of the essences of Muhammad's own preaching. In the tales about claimed former prophets in the Quran, you normally find parallels to Muhammad's life and teachings - it seems to have been essential to him to show that his was a very normal life for prophets (and thus that he was a normal prophet).

Another question is if Muhammad was/is worthy of trust - there are many errors in his book.

p>062 26/126: The claimed prophet Hud said: "So fear Allah and obey me". This was a very central sentence to Muhammad, and it seems to have been essential for him to tell his followers that this was a normal demand from prophets - you find similar sentences from the mouth of claimed former prophets here and there in the Quran - f.x. see 26/108 and 26/110 above. It seems like $ Muhammad needed to show everybody he was a normal prophet

063 26/127a: "No reward do I (Hud*) ask of you for it - - -". Also this was one of Muhammad's (wrong) claims about himself - see 26/125 and 26/126 above. At least for Muhammad this claim was enormously wrong, as he at least claimed total power over his followers, enormous riches (which he according to Islamic books mostly used for bribes to attract and keep followers + not a little to wage war) and lots of women - typical for some false prophets throughout history and even today, whereas real prophets seldom had or wanted much riches and as seldom had more than one wife if any at all (a man like Solomon with all his wives is reckoned to be a powerful king, not a prophet, except in the Quran - the same goes for David (though the word prophet is mentioned)). Also see 26/209a above.

064 26/131: "Now fear Allah and obey me (Hud*)". See f.x. 26/108, 26/110 and 26/126 above.

065 26/143b: "I (Salih*) am to you a Messenger worthy of all trust". See f.x. 26/125a above.

066 26/144: "So fear Allah, and obey me (Salih*)". See f.x. 26/108, 26/110 and 26/126 above

067 26/145a: "No reward do I (Salih*) ask of you for it - - -" See f.x. 26/109a and 26/127a above.

068 26/145c: "- - - my (Salih's*) reward is only from (Allah*) - - -". Another parallel to Muhammad, legitimizing Muhammad as a claimed prophet. see 26/108 above.

069 26/150: "But fear Allah and obey me (Salih*) - - -". See f.x. 26/108, 26/110 and 26/126 above,

070 26/153a: "Thou (Salih*) art only one of those bewitched!" If this is said to "prove" to Muhammad's followers that such words as Muhammad himself met, just were normal for prophets, it is psychologically quite cleverly done.

071 26/154a: "- - - bring us (people) a Sign, if thou (Salih*) tellest the truth!" The same demands Muhammad met from followers and from opponents - see f.x. 26/153 just above. Muhammad never was able to prove anything at all of his central claims. Only claims, statements and evasions.

072 26/160b: "The people of Lut (Lot*) rejected the messengers" - just like Muhammad was rejected in Mecca at the start. The message: To be rejected is normal for prophets - like Muhammad - but "they" will be punished.

073 26/162b: "I (Lot*) am to you a messenger (not said in the Bible*) worthy of all trust". See f.x. 26/125a above.

This part of the story about Lot is far away from the one in the Bible. From where is this information? (We remind you that the Quran is so full of errors, etc., that it is not from any god, and thus no information that way.)

074 26/163: "So fear Allah and obey me (Lot*) - - -". See f.x. 26/108, 26/110 and 26/126 above.

075 26/164a: "No reward do I (Lot*) ask of you for it - - -." See f.x. 26/109a and 26/127a above.

076 26/164c: "- - - my (Lot's*) reward is only from (Allah*) - - -". Another parallel to Muhammad legitimizing Muhammad as a claimed prophet. see 26/108 above.

This part of the story about Lot is far away from the one in the Bible. From where is this information? (We remind you that the Quran is so full of errors, etc., that it is not from any god, and thus no information that way.)

077 26/176c: “- - - the Companions (or People*) of the Wood rejected the messengers“. See f.x. 26/160b above.

078 26/177a: "- - - Shu'ayb - - -". Another claimed prophet in the old Arabia you only find in the Quran. There were 3 of them, and Shu'ayb was the last one. Some Muslims claim he was identical to the father-in-law of Moses, Jethro (2. Mos. 18/1) but it is clear from Islamic sources that Shu'ayb - if he ever existed - lived a few centuries earlier).

079 26/178a: "I (Shu'ayb*) am to you a messenger worthy all trust". See f.x. 26/125a above.

080 26/179: "So fear Allah and obey me (Shu'ayb*)". See f.x. 26/108, 26/110 and 26/126 above.

081 26/179: "So fear Allah and obey me (Shu'ayb*)". See f.x. 26/108, 26/110 and 26/126 above.

082 26/180a: "No reward do I (Shu'ayb*) ask of you for it - - -". See f.x. 26/160 above.

083 26/180c: "- - - my (Shu'ayb's*) reward is only from (Allah*) - - -". Another parallel to Muhammad legitimizing Muhammad as a claimed prophet. see 26/108 above.

084 26/185c: "Thou (Shu’ayb*) art only one of those bewitched!" See f.x. 26/153a above.

085 26/186a: "Thou art no more than a mortal like us (the People of the Wood*) - - -". Another parallel to Muhammad's daily life at that time - and one more "indication" for that Muhammad was a normal prophet.

086 26/186c: "- - - a liar." As a parallel to Muhammad, this is (unintended?) irony, as it is clear Muhammad lied now and then, even in the Quran - and even accepted the breaking of oaths.

087 26/187: "Now cause a piece of the sky to fall down - - -". Also other prophets got requests for proofs they were unable to fulfill according to the Quran - Muhammad was a normal prophet on this point, too, is the underlying message.

088 28/79c: "- - - those whose aim is the Life of this World - - -". One of Muhammad's many negative names for non-Muslims - as you understand there were non-Muslims among the Jews of Moses, too. Moses and Muhammad were quite alike. At least according to Muhammad.

089 30/47c: “We did indeed send, before thee (Muhammad*), messengers to their (respective) peoples - - -.” It is generally an accepted fact – among clergy and science alike, that Abraham was a stranger to Canaan, Lot (a prophet according to the Quran) a stranger to Sodom and Gomorrah, that Jonah was a stranger to Nineveh, the town to which he was sent. Joseph was a stranger in Egypt, and Moses a stranger in Sinai (or Sudan?) when he fled from Egypt. Most prophets worked among their own people, but in contradiction with the Quran, not all.

090 33/7a: "- - - We (Allah*) took from the Prophets their Covenant - - -". Even if we omit the fact that the Bible talks about Yahweh and the Quran about Allah - 2 obviously very different gods - there still remains the fact that Yahweh did not make that kind of a covenant with his prophets like said in verses 7 and 8, for the very obvious reason that he did not need that kind of information - according to the Bible Yahweh is really omniscient for things which happens, and then why should he ask for what he already knew? One more clear difference between Yahweh and Allah. Not the same god. Also see 67/9c below - a strong one. But of course it is ok for Islam to prove - prove - the Bible wrong and the Quran right. But as we say: Prove, not just loose claims and as loose and invalid words like the Quran always use instead of proofs.

091 33/7b: "- - - We (Allah*) took from the Prophets their Covenant: as (We did) from thee (Muhammad*) - - -". There is no proof for a covenant between Allah and Muhammad - or the Muslims. A number of claims, but not one proof. Worse: The only "documentation" for his very existence is a made up - at least from no god - book based only on the words of a man with highly dubious moral and reliability, liking power and women (not uncommon for self proclaimed "prophets".

And the covenants with the Biblical prophets were with Yahweh, not with Allah, according to the Bible, and - where information about their real religion exists - also in accordance with science.

092 34/34a: "Never did We (Allah*) send a warner to a population, but the wealthy ones among them said: 'We believe not in the (Message) - - -". For one thing this is wrong, there were prophets in the Bible who were believed (f.x. Samuel). But the other thing is that this hardly is information, but psychology: Mainly only poor and uneducated people accepted Muhammad the first 12-14 years (until Muhammad started to gain wealth and power), and then it was soothing for his followers to "know" this was normal for prophets (this surah is believed to be from 620 AD).

093 35/4b: "- - - so were the messengers rejected before thee (Muhammad*) - - -". You will see many places that it was essential for Muhammad to claim he was just like the old Jewish prophets - and he indicated that this meant he was just a normal prophet (though in too many ways he differed from them - his teachings, his life, his basic ideas, his demand for riches, his womanizing, his point of view concerning honesty and even oaths, etc. - he is not in that line).

Besides quite a number of the old Jewish prophets were not rejected.

094 35/25a: "And if they (people*) reject thee (Muhammad*), so did their predecessors - - -". For Muhammad it seems to have been essential to show that he was treated just like earlier prophets, to "document" that he himself was a real and ordinary prophet like the old ones.

095 36/3d: "- - - one of the messengers - - -". Muhammad claimed to be in the same line of prophets ("messenger" is not used as a title in the Bible) as the Biblical ones. To be in that line, his teachings had to be similar to theirs, and also the facts and prophesies had to be an integrated part of the ones from the prophets in that line. Nothing of this is the case. In spite of strong - and like normal from Muhammad and Islam not proved - claims Muhammad is not in that line of prophets. His deeds, demands, introduced rules, code of moral, etc. all clearly places him far outside that line - and places both him and his religion in the line of religions of war, together with religions like the one of the Vikings, the Mayas, the moral code of Genghis Khan, etc.

096 36/13-27: A story with similar problems of disbelief which met Muhammad - good for his followers in ca. 614-615 to hear that this was the normal for prophets, and to hear the happy ending. There are numbers of such stories in the Quran. Good psychology towards his followers, especially from verse 20 on. And just for the record: There is no such story in the Bible.

097 36/14a: The 2 + later 1 messenger: Muslims like to see these as Moses and Jesus followed - and strengthened - by Muhammad. But there is no indication for that this is the meaning. Also remember here that there were many more prophets in Israel than Moses and Jesus - a god did not need to choose just these two. In reality it also had been impossible, as there were some 1300 years between those two - if also Moses was a real person - and another some 600 years till Muhammad, whereas the 3 in these verses (36/13-21) lived at the same time and worked together.

098 36/15c: This verse and up to 36/19 is a mirror of what Muhammad experienced at this time (614-15 AD - not long after he had started his preaching in earnest). In the Quran you find many stories which are such parallels - they told his followers that his situation was normal for claimed prophets, and this indicated that he was a real prophet.

099 36/20b: "Obey the messengers - - -". Not obey the god, but obey the messengers - just Muhammad's message here on Earth, as to obey Allah on Earth in reality meant to obey Muhammad.

100 36/21b: "- - - those who have themselves received guidance - - -". A new mirror of Muhammad’s situation. But the $64ooo question is: Did Muhammad really receive guidance?. The point easy to answer, is that he in case did not receive it from any god - all the errors, etc. in the Quran prove that. The difficult point is: If he all the same received guidance, them from whom or what? - dark forces? - a sick brain? - a cold, scheming brain? The harsh and bloody parts of the book indicate something.

101 36/21d: (YA3967): "Prophets do not seek their own advantage". If you read the Bible, you will find that this mostly is correct. Which is another indication/proof for that Muhammad was no prophet - he wanted and got power and obedience (in addition to riches for bribes for more power and women - he was well off when he died (in spite of Muslims' claims about his poverty), f.x. with estates in Medina, Fadaq, and Khaybar).

102 36/30b: "There comes not a messenger to (Allah's servants*) but they mock them". Not correct as there are prophets in the Bible who were not mocked (f.x. Samuel) - especially as widely as the Quran uses the words prophets and messengers. And the Quran recons the Jews to be servants of the god, albeit mostly failed ones. (The main thing with all these claims that all prophets were mocked, was to show his followers that this was a normal situation.)

103 36/52d: "And true was the word of the messengers!" The tale Muhammad is telling "confirms" Muhammad's claim that he is telling the truth. Convenient. But believable? One of the proofs for that Muhammad was not in the same line of prophets as the old Jewish ones, whom he here mainly refers to, is just all the errors, etc. in the Quran + the fact that he lies some places in the book, f.x. by telling that the reason why Allah did not make miracles, was that it would make nobody believe anyhow. (For some reason or other Islam and its Muslims seldom claim that Islam is the religion of honesty.)

104 38/4c: "- - - from among themselves - - -". Muhammad stressed that prophets came from the people among whom they should work - that was one of his "alibis" for being a prophet even though he was an Arab. For Jews it was correct - their prophets were Jews. But Jonah was not from Nineveh, Abraham not from Canaan, Lot not from Sodom or Gomorrah, Joseph not from Egypt, Moses not from Midian, to mention some of whom the Quran reckons to be prophets.

105 38/12a: "Before them (Muhammad's opponents*) (were many who) rejected messengers - - -". Muhammad claimed Allah through all times and to all people had sent messengers - 124ooo through the times is a number mentioned in Hadiths. He even - wrongly - included the old biblical prophets in this claimed group. But except for the biblical ones and for Muhammad himself, neither science, nor Islam has found one single trace from any of them anywhere.

106 38/13b: "- - - the People of Lut (Lot*) - - -". Here is indicated the inhabitants of Sodom (and Gomorrah) were Lot's people, but this is wrong, as it for one thing is very clear both in the Bible and in the Quran, that Lot was not from there (he was from Ur of the Chaldeans in what now is south Iraq), and also from the texts in both the Bible and the Quran it is very clear he was not naturalized into the local society, even though he at that time seems to have lived in or near Sodom. But Muhammad had to say it in this way to be able to claim that prophets (himself included) were sent to their respective people - in the Quran Lot is a prophet - so as to "prove" it was correct that the Arab Muhammad was sent to Arabs.

107 39/71d: "- - - from among yourselves - - -". Muhammad again and again stresses that prophets come from the people it is going to work among (even though the claim is not 100% true). This makes it natural that a prophet in Arabia is and Arab - "ergo" Muhammad was a normal prophet (though the greatest of them all). As Muhammad had no proofs for his claims, he had to legitimize himself in other ways.

108 39/71f: "- - - this Day of yours (sinners*) - - -". The Day of Doom.

109 40/5e: "- - - every People plotted against their prophet - - -". This is in no way documented. Even the Jews, who became infamous on this point, only plotted against some of its prophets - this claim thus is wrong, unless Islam proves - proves - it right. But this was said around 616 - 618 AD - Muhammad was not well liked in Mecca, and by telling his followers that this was normal for prophets, he could pretend to be a normal prophet.

110 40/5f: "- - - every People plotted against their prophet - - -". The Quran claims that every people at all times and all over the world had at least one prophet from Allah, teaching Islam - Hadiths mention 124ooo through the times, and even that number may be too low. Neither science nor Islam has been able to find any kind of traces from any of them, older than 610 AD when Muhammad started his new religion. (This verse in reality is part of a pep-talk to Muhammad's followers in a difficult time (the surah is from ca. 616 - 618 AD) - and also "showing" that Muhammad's problems were normal for prophets, and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet).

111 40/24f: "- - - they (Ramses II, Haman, Qarun*) called (him (Moses*)) 'a sorcerer telling lies!'" See 40/25d below.

#112 40/78d: "It was not (possible) for any messenger to bring a Sign except by leave of Allah - - -". Is this why Muhammad never brought a sign, not to mention a proof for Allah or for his own connection to a god? Muhammad never brought even a tiny wee bit of a corner of such a sign or proof. (Hadiths claims he did, but the Quran indirectly, but totally unmistakably proves that all those stories about miracles are made up ones - a fact Islam admits by stating that there are no miracles connected to Muhammad "except the making of the Quran".

It is no problem for f.x. a false prophet/messenger to claim he was/is bringing signs - and claim was all that Muhammad did here, as he never proved even one of his claimed signs.

113 41/14e: Notice how remarkably well these claimed messengers' situation mirrors Muhammad's situation around 616 - 618 AD when this surah was made. You find numbers and numbers of stories in the Quran paralleling Muhammad's own situation at the time the story was told. The tales "informed" his followers and others that Muhammad's situation was normal for messengers and prophets, and by implication that he was a normal messenger, and they also were pep-talks for his followers. True or not is not always essential - the main thing is what you are able to make people believe.

114 42/3c: “Thus doth (He (Allah*)) send inspiration to thee (Muhammad*) as He did to those (prophets*) before thee - - -.” This is directly wrong and contradicted by the Bible - but in this case we do not accuse Muhammad of knowing he was lying - he did not know the Bible and most likely just said what he wanted his audience to hear, not knowing whether it was right or wrong. A bluff simply (but also bluffs are lying, really.) For Muhammad it was essential to impress on his audience and followers that he was a normal prophet just like the old ones in the Bible. Because of that you find that a large part of the stories are told like parallels to Muhammad's life and activity - so also here; Muhammad claimed he got most of his claimed information from Allah via inspiration, and then the old prophets had to have received it in the same way for Muhammad to be similar to them. Unluckily the Bible tells that Yahweh only used direct contact (Abraham, Moses, Samuel, Jesus, and a few more), visions, and dreams (4. Mos. 12/6-7). Sending messages to prophets by means of inspiration is nowhere mentioned in the Bible. But of course it is ok for Islam to prove - prove - the Bible wrong and the Quran right. But as we say: Prove, not just loose claims and as loose and invalid words like the Quran always use instead of proofs.

But at least this became a lie by omission, because he did not correct the claim later when he had possibility to check if the claim was right.

115 43/7: "And never came there a prophet to them (the people of the old*) but they mocked him". Muhammad was much mocked in Mecca, and tales like this were good for claiming his situation was normal for prophets. But it is not true. There were prophets in the old Israel/Judah who were not mocked - f. x. Samuel. See 43/6-8.

116 43/24e: "- - - we (non-Muslims*) deny that ye (prophets (here like Muhammad*)) are sent (on a mission at all)". Already at that time many were skeptical to Muhammad, and this - like here - was mirrored in his tales in the Quran; if earlier claimed prophets had met the same problems like Muhammad, this indicated that such problems were normal for prophets, and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet. If tales like this are true or not, do not matter very much as long as the followers believe them. And little by little he grew too strong military and economically.

117 43/47c: " - - - they (Pharaoh Ramses II and his people*) ridiculed them (Moses and Aaron*)- - -". See 43/20b above.

118 43/53: "Then why are not gold bracelets bestowed on him (Moses*), or (why) come (not) with him angels accompanying him in procession?" These were questions Muhammad got from skeptics, and it is remarkable how eager Muhammad (or Allah?) was to project his own position in life and his own problems, into the claimed lives of earlier prophets or claimed prophets - a way of telling his followers and others that his problems were normal ones for prophets, and thus that he was a normal prophet. That the above topics are not mentioned in the Bible at all, did not matter - he got a little legitimating from it.

#119 43/63d: “(Jesus said*): fear Allah and obey me - - -.” This is really is Muhammad’s slogan – he wanted power, that much is easy to see from the Quran, and religion/Allah was his Platform of Power. And many places in the Quran it becomes clear that Muhammad wants everyone to believe he was a “normal” (but top) prophet (actually he was no real prophet, as he did not have the gift of making prophesies – see chapter about Muhammad in "1000+ Mistakes in the Quran" or 9/885 above.), and then it was nice if Jesus used the same words like Muhammad and showed this was normal ways for prophets to talk. But one of the really – and one of many - fundamental differences between Jesus and Muhammad (and for that case between f.x. Buddha and Muhammad and also between most of the Jewish prophets and Muhammad), was that Jesus was absolutely not interested in power on this Earth. Consequently this slogan that Muhammad very frequently used to secure his power, was meaningless for Jesus. (The Quran does not oppose this fact: That Jesus preached, but he did not seek power on Earth.) What Jesus said was: "Follow me". There is an abyss between those two sentences.

Also the verse below can be taken as part of a strategy for reducing Jesus from something special to something ordinary – at least an ordinary prophet – to make it easier for Muhammad to be number one (another obvious example: During Muhammad’s claimed trip to heaven, Jesus lived in the lowest of the prophets’ heavens – heaven number 2. Whereas other known prophets from the Bible lived higher up and closer to the god, and Muhammad was to be given place in the 7. heaven, the closest one to the deity):

Finally there is the death and resurrection of Jesus. If that really happened, Jesus clearly was at least one division higher up than Muhammad. So according to Muhammad and the Quran it did not happen.(Well, one place the Quran admits that Jesus died and was reborn (19/33). As he also according to the Quran was taken up to Heaven alive (4/158), which confirms that he has to have been resurrected from his death.

120 43/88d: "Truly these are people who will not believe". One more parallel to Muhammad's life - Muhammad must be a real prophet!(?)

121 44/18c: "I (Moses*) am to you a Messenger worthy of all trust". This was one of the claims Muhammad told about himself, and in the Quran you find several claimed or real(?) prophets using the same expression - it impressed his followers that this was a normal statement for prophets, and thus that it for one thing was ok for Muhammad to demand all trust from them, and for another that he was a normal prophet behaving like other prophets.

122 44/19c: "- - - I (Moses*) come to you (Pharaoh Ramses II*) with authority manifest". Similar to 44/18c above.

123 46/22d: "Then bring upon us (skeptics*) the (calamity) with which thou (Hud*) dost threaten us (skeptics*) with". A new exact parallel to Muhammad's position: Requests for proofs Muhammad never was able to deliver. See 46/22c just above.

124 46/22-26: A close parallel to Muhammad's position in 620 AD, followed by what Muhammad threatened his contemporaries with if they would not accept his new religion. This is a technique he uses many times in the Quran, and it "told" his followers that his position was normal for prophets, and thus he could claim to be a normal prophet. For his followers it surely also helped to be told that the bad people of the past were punished, and thus that their "bad contemporaries surly would be punished, too. (Well, in some cases they instead became good Muslims - Muhammad only had those two endings on those tales.) Also notice that Muhammad often claimed that the punished societies were mightier and richer than his contemporary Arabs, something which should make both his already omnipotent god and the impression on his listeners even stronger.

125 50/2b: "But they (people*) wonder that there has come to them a Warner from among themselves." Muhammad often returns to the fact that he is an Arab, not a Jew like all other documented prophets (Hud and the few other claimed prophets in the Quran not taken from the Bible, are not documented from any other source). To make himself a normal prophet, may be one of the reasons why he told about so many other non-Jewish prophets claimed to have existed to all times and in all cultures and lands. He also uses the fact that he is not a Jew as a never proved claim for why the Jews did not accept his religion (whereas the real reason was that the Jews - who knew their scriptures - saw that a lot of things were wrong in Islam compared to what Yahweh had told them).

126 50/14a: "- - - each one (of them (the tribes mentioned in 50/12-14*)) rejected the Messengers - - -". Except for Noah, Pharaoh and Lot, none of these are mentioned in the Bible - and like so often their stories are parallels to the one of Muhammad at the time when the stories were told or before. This "told" his followers that Muhammad's problems were normal for prophets, and thus that Muhammad was an ordinary - though extraordinary - prophet. Nice for his followers to "know" and good claims (true or not true) for Muhammad.

127 51/52: "- - - no messenger came to the Peoples (anywhere in the world*), but they said (of him (wrong, as there also were a few women like Miriam (the sister of Moses), Huldah (2. Chr. 34/22), Deborah (Judges 4/4), Noadiah (Neh. 6/14), unnamed one (Is. 8/3), and Anna (Luke2/36))) in like manner, 'A sorcerer or one possessed". This is wrong, as such accusations are not reported for a number of the Biblical prophets. But Muhammad was accused of this, and then it was good psychology to tell that this was normal for all prophets or messengers and thus that Muhammad was a normal such one.

###128 53/56: “This is a Warner (Muhammad*), of the (series of) Warners of the old”. Muhammad impressed and impressed and impressed on his followers that he was one of a long series – though the greatest of all – of prophets (even though he per definition was no prophet, as he did not have the gift of making prophesies – he just “borrowed” that prestigious title), as that gave him “weight” and prestige. And to belong to the one timeless “right” religion, also gave his teachings weight among the ones who believed it (Science have never found any traces of a religion like Islam anywhere or any time before 610 AD – if they had, you bet Islam had told about it.) But he in case definitely did not belong to the same series as the Jewish prophets, included Jesus – the teachings, not to mention their actual lives and deeds and moral codes, were too different. AND they made prophesies - real prophesies – which he was unable to.

129 54/9d: "Here is one possessed!" This was some of what was said about Muhammad, too. If you read the Quran you will see that more or less all the Biblical and other claimed prophets in the Quran are said to experience the same problems like Muhammad. This told his followers - and others - that his problems were normal for prophets, and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet. Psychologically good stories for people not used to critical thinking. But the stories are not like in the Bible.

130 54/14b: "- - - one (Noah*) who had been rejected (with scorn) - - -". One more of the many parallels to the life of Muhammad (it is likely this was in 614 AD, and Muhammad was scorned and laughed at) - parallels "telling" his followers and others that his problems were normal for prophets, and thus that Muhammad was a normal - though top - prophet. There are many such claimed parallels to Muhammad's life in the Quran - most of the tales about former real or claimed prophets in the Quran have such parallels. Convenient for Muhammad who thus got good explanations, that the claimed and timeless "Mother Book", which the Quran is claimed to be an exact copy of, contained so many such parallels.

131 54/23-31: Thamud's claimed prophet, Salih, had problems similar to Muhammad's - Muhammad thus only had problems normal for prophets = Muhammad was a normal prophet = nice for his followers in 614 AD to know. Also the punishment of "unbelievers" was good psychology to tell followers: We are right and the others will lose.

132 54/24d: "Truly should we (non-Muslims*) then (if they followed a religion like Muhammad's new religion*) be straying in mind, and mad". As the Quran with all its errors, etc. is not from any god, this may be a correct statement. But one more nice and exact parallel to Muhammad's experiences.

And: When used in the Quran words like "true", "truth", "truly", "sure" "surety", "surely", "verity", "verily", etc. normally are claims, not proved facts. Also see 2/2b + 13/1g and 67/9c - 2 strong ones and as for contradictions to the Bible also 40/20b. Also the latter half of the comments to 41/39a is very relevant. These and similar words cannot be taken at face value unless they are proved.

133 54/25: "Nay, he (Muhammad's parallel Salih*) is a liar, an insolent one!". As the Quran - and thus its twin (exact copies from the same claimed "Mother Book" in Heaven) claimed given to the claimed prophet Salih - with all its errors, etc. is not from any god, this may be a correct statement. It at least is clear that Muhammad lied at least some times in the Quran (f.x. when Muhammad claimed that real miracles would make no-one believe - he was too intelligent and knew too much about people, and he knew this was a lie; at least some would believe if they got proofs for Allah).

134 54/33c: "The people of Lut (Lot*) rejected (his (Lot's*) Warning". See comment to 54/2c above.

135 60/4b: “There is for you (Muslims*) an excellent example (to follow) in Abraham and those with him, when they said to their people: ‘We are clear of you and of whatever you worship besides Allah: we have rejected you, and there has arisen, between us and you, enmity and hatred forever - unless you believe in Allah and him alone’ - - -”. Remember that Islam tells often and clearly that what is told in one context in the Quran, nearly always has general and universal meaning and value. Words not possible to misunderstand: Non-Muslims are enemies.

An extra point: To have another religion is enough for the good Muslim (according to Islam and here to the Quran) to feel "enmity and hatred forever". Rather a thought provoking piece of information.

136 60/4k: "- - - though I (Abram/Abraham*) have no power (to get) aught on thy (other people's*) behalf from Allah". One more parallel to Muhammad himself. There are many such parallels in the Quran - more or less all real or claimed prophets the book tells about, are such parallels - there is no doubt(?) Muhammad must be a normal parallel!

137 60/6a: “There was indeed for them (Abram/Abraham and his people in 60/4*) an excellent example for you (Muslims*) to follow - - -.” See 60/4a-f and 60/4-6 above. No further comments necessesary.

138 61/5b: “Why do ye (Jews*) wex and insult me, though ye know that I (Moses*) am the Messenger of Allah (sent) to you (Jews*) - - -.” This sentence is not from the Bible. But it makes Moses' life look like a parallel to Muhammad's life, and thus document that Muhammad's life was a normal one for prophets - and thus that Muhammad was a normal prophet. If you read the Quran, you will see that this is done to all the prophets Muhammad tells about in the Quran, with the partly exception of Jesus (the story of Jesus was too well known, and not all of it could thus be "adjusted").

139 69/10a: "And disobeyed (each) the messenger of their Lord (Allah*); so He punished them with an abundant Penalty". Learn by the parallel: This happened to people disobeying claimed earlier messengers, and it will/may happen you too, if you disobey the claimed messenger Muhammad. Muhammad made most of the claimed or real prophets mentioned in the Quran, to parallels to his own situation in life. In this way he for one thing "documented" that his problems were normal problems for prophets, and for another that he thus was a normal prophet.

140 71/1-20: Like Muhammad at this time (621 - 622 AD), Noah (and other claimed prophets Muhammad told about) had limited success - just like Muhammad. "Ergo" Muhammad was a normal prophet with normal problems. True? More or less all claimed and real prophets in the Quran were parallels to Muhammad at the time when the different surahs were told - just read the Quran with open eyes, and you will see this. We may add that even though the story roughly follows the Bible, the details are very different. As they are not from the Bible and not from a god - no book with so much wrong like the Quran is from any god - where did Muhammad get them from?

141 71/2a: "O my (Noah's*) People!" I am to you a Warner, clear and open - - -". Exactly Muhammad's own words. See 71/1-20 just above.

142 71/9: "Further I (Noah*) have spoken to them (his claimed opponents*) in public and on private - - -". Not from the Bible, but very parallel to Muhammad's own experience till then (he did not get many followers until after he started as a robber baron and got riches to offer and became more powerful). See 71/1-20 above.

143 71/23a: "And they (claimed opponents of Noah*) have said - - -: 'Abandon not - - -'" For one thing: Note the close parallel to Muhammad's experience in 621 - 622 AD when this surah was published - Noah like all other prophets with the partly exception of Jesus, was made to look like a parallel to Muhammad - "it showed" that Muhammad's problems were normal for real prophets, and indicated thus that Muhammad was a real prophet. Just read the Quran and you will see how often and how obvious this technique was used. For another thing: This is one more time anomaly.

144 71/28d: According to Muhammad and the Quran, Noah prayed: "- - - to the Wrongdoers grant Thou (claimed to be Allah*) no increase but in perdition". This is claimed to be in a message from Allah. Compare this to NY - f.x. "the lost coin" (Luke 15/8-10), "the lost sheep" (Matt.18/12-14), "the lost son" (Luke 15/11-31), "the 11. hour" (Matt. 20/8/13) - and you have one more 100% for that Yahweh and Allah were not the same god, and Jesus and Muhammad not in the same line of the moral rules = not in the same religion.

145 73/15e: "- - - even as we (Allah*) sent a Messenger (Moses*) to Pharaoh." For one thing it is likely it was Yahweh who sent Moses, but that aside: Is the comparison to Moses correct? - if either the Bible or the Quran or both tell the truth on this point, Moses strongly proved he had connection to something supernatural. Muhammad never proved even an atom of his claims - there only were strong, but loose claims and as cheap words and even at least a few lies plus demands for and glorification of blind belief - all of which are hallmarks of cheats, swindlers and deceivers.

146 91/11-14: Notice how parallel the basics of this story - and many other stories in the Quran - are to Muhammad's situation at the time it was told. The psychology behind such parallels is to "explain" that Muhammad's situation was normal for a prophet, and that Muhammad thus was a normal prophet.

Sub-total Chapter 8 = 146 + 379 = 525.


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This work was upload with assistance of M. A. Khan, editor of islam-watch.org and the author of "Islamic Jihad: A Legacy of Forced Conversion, Imperialism, and Slavery".